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Your Presence Written in the Past
Your Presence Written in the Past
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The Wind That Shakes the Barley

The Wind That Shakes the Barley

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Regular price $13.91 Sale price $19.93

Actor: Cillian Murphy

Aspect Ratio: 1.78:1

Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

Brand: Genius Productions

Director: Ken Loach

Features:

  • Condition: New
  • Format: DVD
  • Closed-captioned; Color; DVD; Widescreen; NTSC

Format: Multiple Formats

Genre: Dramas

Package Dimensions: 7.5 x 5.3 x 0.5 inches

Number Of Discs: 1

Publisher: IFC

Release Date: 2007-09-04

Running Time: 127

Details: In this historical drama, two brothers find themselves on opposing sides in Ireland's struggle for freedom from Britain.Winner of the Palme d'Or at the 2006 Cannes Film Festival, this gripping drama by Ken Loach (Raining Stones) is set during the early days of the Irish Republican Army, when British occupation of the Irish radicalized many a citizen and caused some to take up arms. Cillian Murphy plays Damien, a medical student on his way to London when he witnesses a couple of atrocities committed by British troops. Instead of becoming a doctor, he turns into a leading and respected figure in an IRA division led by his brother, Teddy (Padraic Delaney). The film provides some fascinating historical insight into the nascent resistance movement as it was in 1920, and Loach brilliantly conveys the profound emotional transition young men had to make to become saboteurs and killers. Loach's realistic style is absolutely mesmerizing, with many scenes built around the dynamics of large groups: contentious meetings, torture sessions, battles, celebrations, and the like. One has the sense of history as a pool of energy, and one also develops a kind of Renoiresque appreciation for the fact that different people on opposing sides of a life-or-death issue have their reasons for believing what they believe. As the story moves along, subtle shifts in the perspectives of men and women who had once agreed to be absolute in their fight for freedom results in a tragic yet understandable schism among Irish patriots. The final half-hour of The Wind That Shakes the Barley says a lot about how the Irish, including people who had known one another all their lives, turned their wrath on one another for so many decades. This is an outstanding film, featuring the best performance yet by Murphy (Red Eye). --Tom Keogh

UPC: 796019802529

EAN: 0796019802529

 

Ogham is the earliest written form of Primitive Irish, the oldest of the Gaelic languages. Ogham was first used in Ireland and parts of England, Scotland and Wales between the 2nd and 6th centuries. Though its actual origins remain a mystery today, it is believed the Celts desired a cryptic alphabet that could not be deciphered by Roman Britain.

Ogham Alphabet

Represented as a series of perpendicular and intersecting lines, this ancient script is thought to be influenced by the Latin alphabet using 20 characters. It is most commonly written vertically and is read from bottom to top. When presented horizontally, it is read from left to right.

Ogham was carved into stones and trees to mark land boundaries or to commemorate a member of the community. Today there are roughly 400 surviving stones featuring proper names, ancestral and tribal affiliations, and Latin words.
Ogham Stone Kilmalkedar Dingle County Kerry