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Mullingar Pewter Celtic Flask - Celtic Curator Ogham Art
Whiskey Flask Celtic Dragon Stainless Steel & Pewter Irish Made
Mullingar Pewter Celtic Flask - Celtic Curator Ogham Art
Mullingar Pewter Celtic Flask - Celtic Curator Ogham Art
Mullingar Pewter Celtic Flask - Celtic Curator Ogham Art

Whiskey Flask Celtic Dragon Stainless Steel & Pewter Irish Made

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Regular price $64.28 Sale price $64.32

Brand: Mullingar Pewter

Color: Silver

Features:

  • The whiskey flask can hold up to 8 ounces for the perfect pour.
  • Made from stainless steel with a pewter Celtic dragon design on the front.
  • Features an attached screw on cap for easy open and close!
  • Crafted in Co. Westmeath Ireland by Mullingar Pewter and gift boxed for easy gift giving!

Publisher: Mullingar Pewter

Details: This stunning whiskey flask bring will bring the Irish spirit to your choice in spirits! Holding up to 8 ounces of liquid, this whiskey flask makes a great gift for any whiskey lover in your life. This flask features pewter Celtic dragons on the front, their bodies formed from spirals. Celtic dragons are guardians of wisdom and symbols of power. This whiskey flask is created from stainless steel with a pewter dragon design on the front. Pewter is a malleable metal alloy that allows the dragons to be intricately detailed. This whiskey flask is crafted by Mullingar Pewter in Co, Westmeath Ireland. Mullingar Pewter was founded in 1974 and has been a central force in bringing back the traditional art of crafting with pewter. The employees at Mullingar are skilled craftspeople who have spent years perfecting the art of casting and carving with pewter. This whiskey flask from Mullingar Pewter is sure to bring you joy and warmth with every sip!

 

Ogham is the earliest written form of Primitive Irish, the oldest of the Gaelic languages. Ogham was first used in Ireland and parts of England, Scotland and Wales between the 2nd and 6th centuries. Though its actual origins remain a mystery today, it is believed the Celts desired a cryptic alphabet that could not be deciphered by Roman Britain.

Ogham Alphabet

Represented as a series of perpendicular and intersecting lines, this ancient script is thought to be influenced by the Latin alphabet using 20 characters. It is most commonly written vertically and is read from bottom to top. When presented horizontally, it is read from left to right.

Ogham was carved into stones and trees to mark land boundaries or to commemorate a member of the community. Today there are roughly 400 surviving stones featuring proper names, ancestral and tribal affiliations, and Latin words.
Ogham Stone Kilmalkedar Dingle County Kerry